Tag Archives: black history month

Black History Month Trailblazer: Teniadé Broughton

Teniadé BroughtonTeniadé Broughton is the council member for District 5 and a proud seventh-generation Pensacolian.

Teniadé is a graduate of Booker T. Washington High School, the University of West Florida, and Florida A&M University. Deeply active in the community, Teniadé is a seventh-generation Pensacolian and member of Allen Chapel AME Church, the president of the John Sunday Society, the chairperson of the Escambia County Equal Justice Initiative, and a member of the Gallery Night Pensacola Board, Pensacola Bicentennial Celebration Committee, Junior League of Pensacola, and JUST Pensacola.

Teniadé has one son who is currently serving on active duty in the United States Air Force.

During her election campaign, she expressed why she was running for City Council. “I am running for City Council because I love this city and I love my neighbors. District 5 is the heart of Pensacola and home to so many of the people who make our city so special. I’m running to make our neighborhoods stronger, to support and grow our small businesses, and to improve the quality of life for every single person in the district.” She was elected to the Pensacola City Council in 2020.

In December 2021, historian Teniadé Broughton hosted a black history tour known as “Highlights in Black.” The tour allowed each museum to illuminate different aspects of black history and culture within the African diaspora in order to educate people about the perils and triumphs of black people in Pensacola and throughout the country.

As one of our local historians on local African-American heritage and culture, she illustrated truths and spoke of important historical occurrences as she walked through downtown Pensacola on an epic, one-of-a-kind tour.

To this day, Teniadé continues to put in efforts to teach the community about the diversity of Pensacola’s history. She wants the community to learn how we have really survived some of the worst times in our history and how to keep a positive outlook on where we’re headed in the future.

Teniadé Broughton
City Council
Title: City Council Member District 5
Phone: 850-903-2051
Email Councilwoman Broughton

Joe Zarzaur is a Board Certified Civil Trial Lawyer whose firm is dedicated to promoting community safety since 2007. ZARZAUR LAW’S AREAS OF PRACTICE: Serious Personal Injury, Product Defect, Auto Accidents, Cycling Accidents, Motor Vehicle Accidents, Products Liability, Wrongful Death, Community Safety, Boat and Jet Ski Accidents, Slip and Fall Injuries, and more. Licensed in Alabama and Florida.

We know accidents can be stressful and want to make the process as easy as possible for you. Call Zarzaur Law, P.A. today at (855) Hire-Joe for a free legal consultation or visit www.zarzaurlaw.com.

 

Sources:

https://www.pnj.com/story/news/2021/11/26/highlights-in-black-five-pensacola-museum-exhibits-black-history-december-4-2021/6404872001/?fr=operanews

Pensacola News Journal

‘Highlights in Black’ will spotlight 5 exhibits in Pensacola that illuminate Black history

“Highlights in Black” is a free night out that features 5 museums illuminating Black history, art, and culture within the African diaspora (731 kB)

https://www.pnj.com/story/news/2021/11/26/highlights-in-black-five-pensacola-museum-exhibits-black-history-december-4-2021/6404872001/?fr=operanews

https://pensacola.momcollective.com/in-around-pensacola/seeing-what-is-in-front-of-us-cont[…]g-the-walk-through-black-history-in-downtown-pensacola/

Pensacola Mom Collective

Seeing What Is in Front of Us: Continuing the Walk Through Black History in Downtown Pensacola

Get out there and see what is very much a part of the fabric of Pensacola.

Black History Month Trailblazer: Rosamond Johnson, Jr.

Rosamond Johnson Jr.Article By: Gulf Coast Veterans Council

A Young Pensacola Native Turned Hero, Rosamond Johnson Was The First Soldier From Escambia County, Florida To Die In The Korean War.

The story of Rosamond Johnson is compelling:  getting permission from his parents at age 15 so he could serve his country in the military; his heroic acts during the Korean War to save his fellow soldiers while under fire, and his ultimate sacrifice, giving his life for his country.  This is even more notable when you realize that this beach that is named after him was one of the few beaches at that time where he and his family and other African Americans could go.  

Rosamond actually comes from a long line of African Americans who served their country in time of war, not necessarily for the freedoms they were afforded back home, but for the promise of that freedom and those rights that our nation aspires to fulfill.

Many Are Not Aware That African Americans Have Participated In Every Single War Fought By Or Within The United States.

Revolutionary War

When the Minutemen gathered at Lexington and Concord in April 1775 for that “shot heard round the world,” African Americans were fighting alongside other Patriots.  At least 5,000 African Americans fought for our new nation during the Revolutionary War, and when the British finally surrendered to George Washington at Yorktown in 1781, about ¼ of the American Army was black.  The sites at Lexington, Concord, and Yorktown are now part of our National Park system.

War of 1812

The War of 1812 with the British brought the fight nearby at the Battle of New Orleans.  Andrew Jackson incorporated two battalions of Free Men of Color into the fray, and the overwhelming American victory began when the British Commanding General was shot – by one of these free black troops.  The site known as Chalmette Battlefield is now part of our National Park system.

Civil War

Many are familiar with the 54th Massachusetts regiment during the Civil War, made famous by the movie “Glory” with Morgan Freeman and Denzel Washington.  But before the 54th Massachusetts, the very first black Union troops – known as Louisiana Native Guard – were raised after New Orleans fell to the Union in 1862.  The 2nd Regiment of the Louisiana Native Guard was stationed at Fort Massachusetts on Ship Island (now part of the Gulf Islands National Seashore) and they launched the first engagement by Black U.S. Army regulars during the Civil War against Confederate troops at Pascagoula, Mississippi in April 1863.

Buffalo Soldiers – The First Park Rangers

Following the Civil War, Congress created six black regiments that became known as “Buffalo Soldiers,” a nickname given them by the Plains Indians.  When the first national parks were created in the west, there was no agency, no National Park Service, to protect and manage them.  Approximately 500 Buffalo Soldiers from the 9th Cavalry Regiment were assigned to Yosemite National Park and Sequoia National Park – basically serving as the first park rangers, fighting forest fires, evicting poachers, and timber thieves, and building the first roads and trails.  Charles Young, the third African American to graduate from West Point, served as the acting military superintendent of Sequoia National Park – and is considered by many to be the first African American superintendent of a national park.  Just last year his home in Ohio was designated as one of our newest National Park Areas – the Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument.  

The Tuskegee Airmen

The famed Tuskegee Airmen were the first African American military aviators in the U.S. armed forces.  Following WWI, it took over 20 years of advocacy by African Americans who wanted to enlist and train as military aviators.  When they were finally allowed to train and get their wings during WWII, the Tuskegee Airmen served with distinction, setting a record for destroying five enemy aircraft in under four minutes, and shooting down three German jets in a single day.  Today the Tuskegee Airmen training site is also part of our National Park System.

Gulf Islands National Seashore is named after Pensacola’s own hero, Rosamond Johnson.


Annual Rosamond Beach Day Ceremony

Rosamond Beach DayThe Perdido Key Chamber of Commerce, through the Military Appreciation Council, in partnership with the Gulf Islands National Seashore, is proud to announce its annual Rosamond Johnson Beach Day. The ceremony will take place Saturday, May 7, 2022 at 10 am at Johnson Beach, which is part of the Gulf Islands National Seashore.

Joe Zarzaur is a Board Certified Civil Trial Lawyer whose firm is dedicated to promoting community safety since 2007. ZARZAUR LAW’S AREAS OF PRACTICE: Serious Personal Injury, Product Defect, Auto Accidents, Cycling Accidents, Motor Vehicle Accidents, Products Liability, Wrongful Death, Community Safety, Boat and Jet Ski Accidents, Slip and Fall Injuries, and more. Licensed in Alabama and Florida.

We know accidents can be stressful and want to make the process as easy as possible for you. Call Zarzaur Law, P.A. today at (855) Hire-Joe for a free legal consultation or visit www.zarzaurlaw.com.

Sources:
https://www.gcvacflalms.org/national-park-service—gcvac-johnson-beach-fl.html

https://www.nps.gov/guis/learn/historyculture/rosamond-johnson.htm?fbclid=IwAR3bmncH4L6MJpXAJvjCr_regtcB7MR9XG-ZynDDGh0fhqBxS1n3gYC43aM

https://history.army.mil/html/books/070/70-65/index.html

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https://www.visitpensacola.com/blog/an-insiders-look-at-black-history-month-in-pensacola/

 

Black History Month Trailblazer: Brian Wyer, Gulf Coast Minority Chamber of Commerce President and CEO

Brian Wyer - Chamber of Commerce President and CEO

What Do You Plan To Do As President And CEO Of The GCMCC?

I started with the Gulf Coast African American Chamber of Commerce as Executive Director in August 2017. During my first year with the chamber, it was determined that we needed to re-brand.

On October 1st, 2018, we officially opened the new Gulf Coast Minority Chamber of Commerce.

I have been the President/CEO of the chamber for the past 3 years. My current goals are to re-introduce the chamber to our community through “Getting Back to the Basics.”

Who Are You And Why Do You Do What You Do?

I was born and raised in Pensacola, FL. I went to Catholic High School and then graduated from UWF with a Management Information Systems degree in 1991. I then spent 22 years working in IT management in Tampa. I returned to Pensacola in 2013 and switched my career to non-profit leadership with the goal of having a positive impact on our community. I have been happily married to my beautiful wife, Harriett, for 28 years and have three children: Steven, Brianna, and Kendra.

As a leader, I am motivated to help create economic equality within our community. The basic premise is that ALL people should be treated fairly. As I network with various groups, I have gained additional insight into areas where improvements are needed. Economic equality has a massive impact on areas such as education, health, politics, and crime.

My involvement in Achieve Escambia, the Equality Project Alliance, the Mental Health Task Force, and the Baptist Community Advisory Council has allowed me the opportunity to meet a wide variety of leaders across numerous sectors of our environment. My goals have been to listen, understand, and gather various viewpoints. Once the information is obtained, I can present it to the community. The requests to share this knowledge are my motivation to educate our community on disparities and brainstorm areas where we can dedicate resources. My motivation is to have a positive impact on society by serving as a role model and leading others to challenge injustices. 

What Is Your Passion And Vision For The Growth And Development Of Minority Entrepreneurship In Our Community?

My passion for the growth and development of minority entrepreneurship stems from the concept of creating more generational wealth. Numerous studies have determined that the best way to elevate our society is for our current generation to become more successful, which in turn will make life better for the next generation.

As new businesses are created and grow, they will:

1. Increase the number of employees.

2. Use passive income to purchase more services or goods.

3. Invest more in savings or stocks.

4. Provide more opportunities to the rest of our community. This will result in families investing more resources in their children through better education and skills. It will allow the parents to leave more resources to the next generation and bypass many of the challenges that their previous generation has encountered.

What Is Your Historical Influence?

From a historical perspective, I am influenced by the actions of Martin Luther King Jr. Dr. King was killed the same year that I was born, and segregation ended only four short years before my birth. Significant strides have been made since these events took place, but improvements are still needed. MLK Jr. influenced me with his handling of inequality through peaceful actions. In the face of violence, injustice, and personal threats, he remained steadfast in addressing the challenges of ending inequalities.

Brian Wyer
President/CEO
Gulf Coast Minority Chamber of Commerce
321 N De Villiers Street
Suite 104
Pensacola, Fl 32501
(office) 850-438-3993

Joe Zarzaur is a Board Certified Civil Trial Lawyer whose firm is dedicated to promoting community safety since 2007. ZARZAUR LAW’S AREAS OF PRACTICE: Serious Personal Injury, Product Defect, Auto Accidents, Cycling Accidents, Motor Vehicle Accidents, Products Liability, Wrongful Death, Community Safety, Boat and Jet Ski Accidents, Slip and Fall Injuries, and more. Licensed in Alabama and Florida.

We know accidents can be stressful and want to make the process as easy as possible for you. Call Zarzaur Law, P.A. today at (855) Hire-Joe for a free legal consultation or visit www.zarzaurlaw.com.